Walls – Second Cut

First wall glued  up ok so we repeated the process with the second wall, i.e spread glue, clamp and then rest old lathe bed on top of the middle of the joint to apply some pressure there.

This weekend’s work consisted of two processes, bolting the wood floor to the trailer frame and starting to route the recesses in the bottom of the walls.

Bolting the frame down went really well, only thing that went wrong was the snapping of a 3mm drill bit so all in all I’m pretty pleased.

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The floor can’t be fully bolted down yet as we still need to get it galvanised, I’m thinking that I may drill the holes out a little larger in order to maintain sufficient clearance once dipped.

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A total of 10 M12 bolts will be used to hold the floor (and therefore the rest of the teardrop to the frame) so I don’t think there is much risk of something going wrong.

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I didn’t get many photos of the second process, I will take some of the finished walls at some point but it basically consisted of sitting the wall in place, drawing up the back of the base where it meets the wall and then across the top.

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This was then routed out at a depth of 11mm for a distance of 80mm from the edge, then stepped up to 9mm for the remaining 36mm until reaching the line. The reason for this recesses to so that when the underlining is painted on to the underside of the floor and the walls there will still be room for the trailer frame to fit. Four small recesses were then cut to house the heads of the bolts.

 

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Walls – First cut

Vicks and I started work on the walls over the weekend. The maximum size of plywood that is available to us at a reasonable price meant that both walls needed to be made out of a couple of pieces joined with a lap joint.

First task was routing one half of the joint on one piece approximately half the depth of the plywood before fine tuning the depth and routing the second half of the joint on the other.

Once this was complete we marked out the profile of the teardrop after which we cut this profile out with a jigsaw.

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From here it was a simple task to rinse and repeat for the second wall using the first as a template.

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One wall section was then able to be glued up, we’ll hopefully glue up the other one tonight given that the first will have had 24 hours to set.

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Drip Tray in the Shower

You know you have an understanding wife when you’re allowed to hang a lathe drip tray in the shower to let the undercoat dry…

Recent TradeMe purchased arrived the other day in the form of an original Myford drip tray. This was something that I was looking out for for a while, the total loss oil system of the ML7 was gradually turning my wood bench into a wood and oil bench. I was considering getting some sheet metal laser cut and then welding it up but when this came up on TradeMe for the sweet sweet price of $50 I knew that it was by far going to be the most ideal solution.

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It arrive in reasonable condition for its age, about 50% of the orange on that picture is rust with the rest just being grime and dirt. Nonetheless I decided to strip it and repaint.

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A quick attack with the disc sander brought it to bare metal in reasonable time, then it was a battle with not only the sun but with hoards of mosquitoes to get an undercoat on it before the sun set. Note airbrush is perfect for smaller items or when not time constrained but in this instance a little slow.

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End result one nicely undercoated drip tray. Weather permitting this will get a couple of top coats this week before install next weekend.

Started working on the walls of the Teardrop in the weekend. Marked out the basic outline of the teardrop using the measurements provided in the instructions. There are still a few of the finer details that need to be marked out before this can be cut out.

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After that it will be a case of routing out the recesses for the roof and for the floor to slot into and then also a number of pockets to reduce the weight of the panel. These pockets will then be filled with polystyrene before the outer face is glued on.